The Storytelling Trust
 

Our Mission

The Storytelling Trust: farrago vitae documents and tells stories
that might otherwise not be told, particularly the experiences and perspectives
of those traditionally excluded from the public record.

A 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization, we aim to
explore and examine the contours of the human experience,
with projects focused on individual and cultural identity.

Historia est vitae magistra.

(History is the tutor of life.)

We create and support arts and humanities projects that become:

 

01.

MULTIMEDIA EXHIBITIONS

02.

AUDIO
NARRATIVES

03.

BOOKS

04.

FILMS

 
 
We tell stories not to die of life.
— ANTJIE KROG
 
Broomsy Salter (pictured at 94 years old) became the first African-American in Freeport, Illinois to move across the “color line” in 1956, when he bought land from a Jewish man and built a house. Until 1966, African-Americans were restricted to buying, renting, and leasing east of Illinois 26. The east side of Freeport has a flood plain.

Broomsy Salter (pictured at 94 years old) became the first African-American in Freeport, Illinois to move across the “color line” in 1956, when he bought land from a Jewish man and built a house. Until 1966, African-Americans were restricted to buying, renting, and leasing east of Illinois 26. The east side of Freeport has a flood plain.

 

Our History

The Storytelling Trust emerged in 2008 from a community-based oral history and photography project, "Untold Stories: Freeport's African-American History," that Abbie Reese was asked to spearhead. Residents of Freeport, Illinois were interviewed and photographed, followed by a traveling multimedia gallery exhibition and an outdoor public art exhibition with six panels that each measured eight-foot by four-foot. The outdoor exhibit was installed across the street from Debate Square and coincided with the town’s sesquicentennial celebration of the Lincoln and Douglas debates, where Douglas declared his “Freeport doctrine,” a compromise on slavery.

 
 
Donate